New Energy Efficiency and Green Appraisal Resource for REALTORS®

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BCAP is proud to announce a new resource for REALTORS® developed by BCAP, the Appraisal Institute (AI) and the National Association of REALTORS (NAR). As homes are increasingly listed with energy efficient features in Multiple Listing Services (MLSs) around the country, it is important for real estate professionals to both understand the benefits of energy efficiency, and how to best communicate with clients about efficiency. When they understand the impact that efficiency upgrades can have on new or existing homes, real estate professionals can advise and refer clients to additional actions they can take to further improve home performance.

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The Energy Rating Index: What does the future hold?

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With the 2018 version of the IECC being developed this year, it seems appropriate to look at the success of the ERI and what the future may hold. The voluntary ERI path for the 2015 IECC gives builders the option of complying with the code by meeting a target Energy Rating Index score. This is a numerical score where 100 equates to the efficiency levels prescribed in the 2006 IECC and 0 is equivalent to a net-zero-energy (NZE) home.

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Do Energy Codes Work?

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Last year, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced that eight states would be part of a three-year Residential Energy Code Field Study. Once completed, the study will provide an unprecedented opportunity to develop new strategies for education, training, and outreach for improving the energy efficiency of single-family homes, as well as a measurement of the impact those activities have on residential energy use.

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Homebuyer Demand for Energy Codes

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Consumer demand for energy efficiency is a topic energy code advocates need to understand. We want to know the answers to questions like “do consumers believe in conserving energy through increasing energy efficiency in their homes?” and “how much are consumers willing to pay for home improvements for efficiency?” so that we can make a stronger case for our support for energy efficient building codes. Recently, BCAP looked at four major consumer surveys and summarized their findings in a fact sheet. Although the surveys were conducted by various organizations, the findings led to a strikingly similar conclusion: Consumers want and expect energy efficiency when buying a new home.

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Appraised Value and Energy Efficiency: Getting It Right

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While location, design, and price are a home buyer’s main considerations, surveys show that buyers rank energy efficiency as one of the most desirable features, and importantly, when there is sufficient energy savings – one they’re willing to pay more for. One way to know that a home is built energy efficiently is to know which energy code it was built to.

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DOE Issues Final Determination On The 2015 IECC

The Department of Energy has announced findings on energy savings from adopting and complying with the 2015 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC). Compared with residential buildings meeting the 2012 IECC, the 2015 edition achieves national source energy savings of approximately 0.87 percent, site energy savings of approximately 0.98 percent, and energy cost savings of 0.73 percent of residential building energy consumption.

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My View: Utah Needs New Energy Codes That Make Buildings, Homes More Efficient

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Air pollution is a top concern for Utah citizens. So is financial stability. Improving our air quality while saving money for Utahns is a win-win opportunity. This summer, decision-makers will be voting whether or not to adopt up-to-date building energy codes that will help new homes and buildings constructed in Utah cut energy waste, lower air pollution and reduce Utahns’ energy bills.

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New Homes Must Meet 2009 IECC to Qualify For Federal Mortgage Insurance

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The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) determined last week that the adoption of the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) for single family homes and ASHRAE 90.1-2007 for multifamily buildings will have zero negative impact on the affordability and availability of certain HUD- and USDA-assisted housing.

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DOE’s Three Year Residential Energy Code Field Study

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In September 2014, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced eight states that would participate in a three year Residential Energy Code Field Study. The states include: Pennsylvania, Maryland, Kentucky, North Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Arkansas and Texas. Through the project, DOE plans to establish a sufficient data set to represent statewide construction trends and detect significant changes in energy use from training, education and outreach activities. Through the project, DOE plans to establish a sufficient data set to represent statewide construction trends and detect significant changes in energy use from training, education and outreach activities.

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Energy Codes Preserve Homeowner Health And Comfort

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This post will dive into mechanical and water heating systems—supply and return duct systems, cooling systems, and hot water piping insulation. Failure to comply with the mechanical system provisions in the IECC can lead to several unintended consequences that negatively affect more than just energy consumption—including indoor air quality, premature equipment failure, and a less-controllable and less-comfortable environment for homeowners and tenants.

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Highlights of the 2015 IECC Residential Code Changes

Looking at what makes the 2015 IECC different from the 2012 version, the biggest change that will affect builders is the addition of an Energy Rating Index (ERI) compliance path. This article will outline some other important changes. Five of the major changes in the 2015 IECC that will affect new home construction include specifying required inspections; revised requirements for vertical access doors; a new requirement for combustion closets; revisions to the building envelope air leakage testing requirements; and revised requirements for duct insulation.

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A note from Sam Rashkin: It’s the Window Stupid…

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Consistently, one of the biggest “ah-hah” moments in energy code training courses is the huge impact windows have on overall wall assembly performance. Even with just a 15% window-to-floor-area ratio, windows represent a giant thermal hole that disproportionately upsets all the good work done on the insulated wall assemblies. Who knew?

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HERS and the IECC Performance Path

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The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory analyzed the relationship between the Residential Energy Services Network (RESNET) Home Energy Rating System (HERS) Index and the traditional simulation-based Performance Path used in the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC). These findings will be important to be aware of as states and municipalities begin to consider adoption of the 2015 IECC, which includes a HERS-like rating system as an alternative compliance path.

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